All posts in Grove Update

  • A Look Inside the Groves – January 2019 Hale Groves Update

    By: The Hale Groves Team | On: | Category: Grove Update

    A thin skin makes Honeybells easy to peel, but also makes them far more delicate in the field. We cradle each individual Honeybell by hand and pick them by clipping the stem. This method is slower, but we do it to ensure that your Honeybells always arrive in perfect condition. Honeybells are a cross between the richly flavored Dancy Tangerine, and the honey-sweet Duncan Grapefruit. The result is a 3-inch delight that is bell-shaped, easy to peel, has very few seeds, and a treasured taste. These bright orange, ripe Honeybells in our groves have a very short season. They are…

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  • A Look Inside the Groves – November 2018 Hale Groves Update

    By: The Hale Groves Team | On: | Category: Grove Update

    Citrus groves are unique in the world of farming in that they provide many areas of tree canopy not only from the citrus trees themselves, but from trees used as windbreaks. Here an egret uses a tree line as cover to take flight in an open area. A statuesque red shouldered hawk keeps a watchful eye over the grove. Birds of prey are one of nature?s most symbiotic forms of pest control, and spotting one is always a treat. Testing and monitoring fruit for quality begins as soon as the fruit sets. Here we inspect a navel on its way…

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  • A Look Inside the Groves – October 2018 Hale Groves Update

    By: The Hale Groves Team | On: | Category: Grove Update

    In the grove an irrigation pipe provides the perfect perch for a tri-colored heron on the hunt for an early morning meal. Clear blue skies frame the deep green foliage and abundant fruit of the new navel orange crop. Warm sunny days and good rainfall are helping these fruit to mature right on schedule. As we measure the progress of navels in the grove, we find that they are already achieving healthy sizes for this time of year. They will soon turn orange and ripen fully. Although the fruit is still green on the outside, a look within reveals the…

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  • A Look Inside the Groves – September 2018 Hale Groves Update

    By: The Hale Groves Team | On: | Category: Grove Update

    Early morning sunshine dries the last drops of dew as we inspect new Navel Oranges. Although the Navels are still green, the consistent afternoon rains have helped develop nice sized fruit, soon to turn orange and mature into their tempting sweetness. In the grove wildlife is our constant companion, and we never know what we may see around the next corner. Along this row of citrus trees, an alert fawn peeks out from the branches but remains cautiously in the shadow as we pass by. We do many jobs to ensure ideal growing conditions for our fruit, and in the…

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  • A Look Inside the Groves – August 2018 Hale Groves Update

    By: The Hale Groves Team | On: | Category: Grove Update

    Work starts early in the grove. Early mornings make for cooler work, and it?s not unusual for us to start that work before sunup. It?s early morning, but our day is well under way. Every piece of fruit starts with a flower and a bee, and grows from there. Orange blossoms mark the beginning of a new season and fill the air, and us, with the hope of what is to come. After flowering, fruit gently expands. For most of the growing summer months, the fruit is various shades and sizes of green. Not surprisingly, it?s highly acidic and not…

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  • A Look Inside the Groves – July 2018 Hale Groves Update

    By: The Hale Groves Team | On: | Category: Grove Update

    About our Grove Update: Each month we visit the same navel orange tree to monitor the health and progress of our premium citrus all season long. About our Grove Update tree Scott, our Procurement Manager and life-long citrus expert, chose a 31-year-old navel orange tree west of Vero Beach to monitor through the season for your enjoyment and learning. Any tree older than 10 years old could be considered “mature” and anything under 10 years old would be “young”. Old vs. young orange trees The primary difference is quality and quantity of citrus, specifically the older the tree, the sweeter…

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